Personal Computer Museum, Canada's Videogame Museum

Philips Micom 2001E

Philips Micom 2001E

Speed4 MHz
Memory128 KB

What's this?

Philips

Release Date: 1/1/1981
Manufacturer: Philips
 
Donated By: Shawn Westbrook
 
The Micom mini is a bit of an oddity in the 'personal computer museum', but it's just too interesting and too rare to ignore. Sold primarily as a word processing system, the Micom was quite advanced in certain ways for its time. Although a daisy wheel printer was connected to the unit, you could actually do special mathematical symbols and even limited graphics with the unique way that it printed. The unit we have has two 8" floppy drives and the machine actually has filters inside of it (like a furnace) to keep it cool. It's also had the side effect of keeping the unit quite clean over the years. In true mini fashion, the controller itself has no interface and appears to do little on its own. You can connect various operating consoles to it to see it actually work. Shown here, the main console actually looks a lot like the Commodore PET. We have a lot of brochures and instruction manuals which we will be posting here because very little information about this machine is out there on the net. If you know more about this unit, please share with us!

Inside Micom

 

This computer is currently interactive in the Museum.
 

Micom 1001 Terminal

Micom 1001 Terminal
This was an additional terminal that could be connected to the Micom. It had a single LCD line for typing into and allowed information to be listened to from a microcassette for dictation. Or was it a storage device? I think we'll have to try it out to know for sure.

Micom Operator Console

Micom Operator Console
This is the operator console terminal for the Micom 2001E. It looks very similar to the PET computer from Commodore.

User Comments
John Webb on Friday, November 18, 2016
I first met Steve Dorsey at 447 Ste Helene Street, 3rd floor, in 1976, Montreal. He was working on the first Micom computer/wordprocessor, having recently left AES. I was an IBM Salesman for Office Products Division. I was scouting around the building for prospects for IBM typewriters, dictation equipment, copiers, and Mag Typewriters, IBM's Wordprocessor. Steve was lunching on a sandwich which he had brought from home, and we began a conversation which turned into a life long friendship. I went to work for Steve at MICOM a few years later, and worked at the Montreal downtown sales branch with Bob Lachance, Paul, Maurice, and a whole bunch of great people. I handled legal market, law firms, in Montreal. Along with Ed Hicks, we developed a software package called LAWPAK, which was an add on software applications program for small law firms, enabling them to do billing, docketing, and so forth. I think it sold for $200. When I met Steve, I introduced myself as the new IBM Sales Rep. His eyes lit up, and he had me come in and sit down…he asked me a million questions about the IBM Memory Typewriter, how it worked, its capacities, etc. I thought, "hmmm, this guy knows a lot more than he is saying." I would see Steve occasionally around town, and heard later on about his history with AES, and developing the AES 90, which IBM feared at the time. I am glad I met Steve, and later went work for him. I sold a huge order to the law firm Phillips Vineberg where every secretary and a MICOM! The firm had desks custom made to accommodate the system, which was huge by today's standards. Susan Shaw, do you remember me? We had good time working together, didn't we? I also participated in sales training over at Ruby Foo's.
John Webb on Friday, November 18, 2016
I first met Steve Dorsey at 447 Ste Helene Street, 3rd floor, in 1976, Montreal. He was working on the first Micom computer/wordprocessor, having recently left AES. I was an IBM Salesman for Office Products Division. I was scouting around the building for prospects for IBM typewriters, dictation equipment, copiers, and Mag Typewriters, IBM's Wordprocessor. Steve was lunching on a sandwich which he had brought from home, and we began a conversation which turned into a life long friendship. I went to work for Steve at MICOM a few years later, and worked at the Montreal downtown sales branch with Bob Lachance, Paul, Maurice, and a whole bunch of great people. I handled legal market, law firms, in Montreal. Along with Ed Hicks, we developed a software package called LAWPAK, which was an add on software applications program for small law firms, enabling them to do billing, docketing, and so forth. I think it sold for $200. When I met Steve, I introduced myself as the new IBM Sales Rep. His eyes lit up, and he had me come in and sit down…he asked me a million questions about the IBM Memory Typewriter, how it worked, its capacities, etc. I thought, "hmmm, this guy knows a lot more than he is saying." I would see Steve occasionally around town, and heard later on about his history with AES, and developing the AES 90, which IBM feared at the time. I am glad I met Steve, and later went work for him. I sold a huge order to the law firm Phillips Vineberg where every secretary and a MICOM! The firm had desks custom made to accommodate the system, which was huge by today's standards. Susan Shaw, do you remember me? We had good time working together, didn't we? I also participated in sales training over at Ruby Foo's.
John Webb on Friday, November 18, 2016
I first met Steve Dorsey at 447 Ste Helene Street, 3rd floor, in 1976, Montreal. He was working on the first Micom computer/wordprocessor, having recently left AES. I was an IBM Salesman for Office Products Division. I was scouting around the building for prospects for IBM typewriters, dictation equipment, copiers, and Mag Typewriters, IBM's Wordprocessor. Steve was lunching on a sandwich which he had brought from home, and we began a conversation which turned into a life long friendship. I went to work for Steve at MICOM a few years later, and worked at the Montreal downtown sales branch with Bob Lachance, Paul, Maurice, and a whole bunch of great people. I handled legal market, law firms, in Montreal. Along with Ed Hicks, we developed a software package called LAWPAK, which was an add on software applications program for small law firms, enabling them to do billing, docketing, and so forth. I think it sold for $200. When I met Steve, I introduced myself as the new IBM Sales Rep. His eyes lit up, and he had me come in and sit down…he asked me a million questions about the IBM Memory Typewriter, how it worked, its capacities, etc. I thought, "hmmm, this guy knows a lot more than he is saying." I would see Steve occasionally around town, and heard later on about his history with AES, and developing the AES 90, which IBM feared at the time. I am glad I met Steve, and later went work for him. I sold a huge order to the law firm Phillips Vineberg where every secretary and a MICOM! The firm had desks custom made to accommodate the system, which was huge by today's standards. Susan Shaw, do you remember me? We had good time working together, didn't we? I also participated in sales training over at Ruby Foo's.
Reed Bodwell on Wednesday, November 02, 2016
Lovely to see this. I tried to donate the precursor, my Micom 2000 to a tech museum some years ago. Unfortunately no takers at the time, so it's been melted down. I still have the O/S listings (written in 8080 assembler). That was originally created on punched paper tape because for the first few years we couldn't afford the floppy drive for the Intel development system.
J on Tuesday, April 05, 2016
A lot of names very familiar to me. I started to work for Micom in the Customer Service department, in the same office as Steven Dorsey in TMR (Montreal). Micom later became part of Philips where I then went on to do customer invoicing in the same department then later joined ISD as the computer operator on the Qantel (no 'u'). Philips was also the distributor of Qantel. This system was used for to support manufacturing, inventory, bills of lading, w.i.p, management reporting etc. Alas, after 14 years, I became a victim of the recession in the early '90's. Quite amazing to come across this. Hello to all.
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